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Bob
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Joined: 23 Oct 2006
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Location: Wisconsin, USA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A toaster oven (or most any other appliance) needs only two knobs - OFF...HIGH...LOW, and a timer that can be set for 1-20 minutes. Any more knobs make the appliance so complex that they can not even explain the function properly in the user manual, they end up with paragraphs of lawyer-talk.

Btw, I have a pizza oven that I purchased about 10 years ago, and it still works great. It has ONE KNOB - a timer. All I have to do is put the pizza in the oven, turn the timer to the number of minutes I want, and wait for it to 'ding' so I know the pizza is done. A small frozen pizza cooks in about 8 minutes. Isn't a pizza oven a distant cousin of a toaster oven?

I guess I was asking too much of a mannequin to expect her to wash my dishes. I think I will have to search for another option. Rolling Eyes

Given the choice, I'd much rather hear Taylor yodel than a mannequin.
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cow109



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
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Location: Mississippi, USA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jerry wrote:
I've been thinking we should market a mannequin with 4 selector knobs. The first would simply be an on-off switch. The second would permit the user to select the language in which you want her to speak. Using the third, one could select conversation or music. The fourth would be for selecting the genre of music. There could be choices for yodel, polka, country, classical, or variety. Of course, a user would have to insert a dollar to activate her. It would give men something to do in department stores.

So... a jukebox with legs? Confused
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Bob
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now that a jukebox can be built around a tiny mp3 player, I suppose any shape is possible. Add some complimentary coffee and donuts, and the wife could shop all day.
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Jerry



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No matter how gorgeous the mannequin converted to a jukebox, I would still miss the ones I listened to and watched as a kid. The selector arm would move up and down a stack of vinyl records until it found the right one. Then it would grasp the record, turn it to the right side, and place it on the turn table. The needle arm would then come over and set the needle on the record. When the song was finished, the selector arm would pick the record up and return it to its proper place in the stack. Those jukeboxes were engineering marvels. Some songs I remember hearing were the Davy Crockett song, 'On Top of Old Smoky', and Patsy Cline's 'Crazy'. I've heard that her 'Crazy' is the number 1 jukebox song of all time, in the world. I remember when songs were a nickel apiece, or 6 for a quarter. "Put Another Nickel In, In the Nickelodeon." -- Teresa Brewer, I think.
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Bob
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a teen I spent a lot of time in local bowling alleys. That's where families hung out, especially in the winter. Bowling alleys had a unique smell, because of all the wax they used on the lanes. And they all had a great jukebox, just like Jerry described above. Mixed with the music was the sound of the balls hitting the pins, it was a comforting sound.

For several years as a teen I was a pinsetter. Our local Catholic church had it's own bowling alley, about 8 lanes, and never got around to installing automatic pin setters. So young guys like me each took care of two lanes, quickly picking up the fallen pins and putting them up in the mechanism, and then returning the ball down the wooden chute. After the 2nd ball, we pulled a lever to lower the pins and place them all back on the alley for the next bowler.

I still have a scar over my left eye where a pin jumped up and smacked me in the head. It didn't really hurt, but when I touched it with my hand, my hand came away bloody. Somebody drove me to the hospital so I could get some stitches. But while the blood was running down my face I felt like a real man, even though I was only about 14. Rolling Eyes


Last edited by Bob on Tue Apr 30, 2013 1:16 am; edited 1 time in total
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kiwicowgirl95
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Joined: 14 Sep 2010
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 1:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jerry, we're singing crazy in school choir! It sounds too much like a female catholic choir version though Rolling Eyes
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Jerry



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never was a pinsetter myself, but some of my friends were, and I would sometimes go back and visit with them for a few minutes while they were working. Occasionally, one would have me get him a coke, or something else to drink. It was hot back there. There was a guy in town whom everyone called Tiny, because he wasn't. When Tiny's ball was coming down the alley, the pinsetter would jump out of the pit, because the ball would hit so hard that pins were flying everywhere. Sometimes, they would fly over and beyond the pit. Once, a setter accidently set the pin mechanism down while a ball was coming down the alley. It damaged the equipment, and that alley was out of order for a while. It wasn't Tiny's ball, and I wasn't in the bowling alley when it happened, but it was the talk of the town for a while.

I'm surprised that bowling isn't more popular. I think it's an awesome family game. But then, I'm surprised that yodeling isn't more popular.

Aishani, I'm glad your choir is singing 'Crazy'. It's a great song, and it is very true to life for a lot of people. I think Willie Nelson wrote it. I read a story about Patsy Cline's recording of it. I don't know if it's true. She was working for a recording company at the time and didn't want to perform the song. They told her to record it or find another job, so she recorded it, and it became the number 1 jukebox song of all time. Crazy for tryin', crazy for cryin', and crazy for loving you. Very true for a lot of folks.

We were talking about Jerry Lee Lewis a while ago. For the first time in a long time, I came across his version of 'Cold Cold Heart' a few days ago. The piano work is amazing. I'd post it, but my copy and paste is no longer working.
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Bob
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, sometimes strong bowlers hit the pins so hard that they would fly all over, and being a pinsetter was sometimes hazardous. If they still had pinsetters today I bet they would be made to dress like hockey goalies. Rolling Eyes

Aishani, Crazy is a great song. I can't imagine what a Catholic choir version would sound like, but I bet I would like it. Btw, it's really great to hear you are again singing with a choir!! I hope it's a fun group. Smile
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Jerry



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know if any of today's bowling alleys use live people as pinsetters. If they do, I'll bet teenagers and their parents have to sign a ream of release forms before kids climb into the pits. The bowling alley in my old home town has been closed for years, but the alleys are still there. People say they are in pretty good shape. Should the wooden paths the balls are rolled on be called lanes? I haven't thought about bowling for a lot of years and have forgotten the terminology. I used to know how to score it, but have forgotten that. I think there was a little square at one corner of the scoring sheet. You put an X in the square for a strike and a single slash for a spare. That's all I remember about it, and if that's wrong, I remember it incorrectly. I think pinsetters were paid 50 cents per line, whatever a line was. I'm not sure if line is the right name for whatever it was. 50 cents might not be right either, but I know they weren't paid very much. But it was OK pocket money for a kid.

I'm also glad you're singing with a choir again, Aishani. I hope it's enjoyable for you this time. When I was a kid and would sometimes attend Catholic services with my friends, I thought the choir sounded good. I think it was made up entirely of girls and women.
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